Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
GI cover
Chief-executive editor:
Jothiram
Vivekanandan

Executive editors:
Ari-Matti
Harri
&
HÃ¥kan
Svedhem

Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems (GI) is an open-access interdisciplinary electronic journal for swift publication of original articles and short communications in the area of geoscientific instruments. It covers three main areas: (i) atmospheric and geospace sciences, (ii) earth science, and (iii) ocean science. A unique feature of the journal is the emphasis on synergy between science and technology that facilitates advances in GI.

News

International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSN) now includable in article assets

19 May 2017

Since early 2016, Copernicus Publications has been enabling authors to connect their articles with underlying or related material such as research data, model code, or scientific videos. To enhance reproducibility it is now also possible to include International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs) as assets.

New article processing charges for GI

18 May 2017

From 1 July 2017 Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems (GI) will increase the article processing charges.

EGU journals: celebrations and growth

16 May 2017

In 2016, the 17 EGU–Copernicus peer-reviewed open-access journals experienced significant growth. We published over 3300 final-revised papers, corresponding to some 53,500 pages, a growth of about 10% compared to the previous year. These papers were downloaded over 645,000 times.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

This paper introduces a hands-on, low-cost device (German industrial property right no. 20 2014 106 048.0) that uses common adapters to mount p-ED-XRF devices so that these can provide bulk-sedimentary chemistry data from non-destructive measurements at the surface of a split sediment core or from other solid samples. The strength of combining p-ED-XRF analyses with this new sample chamber is demonstrated by exemplary sediment cores from an archaeological research project.

Philipp Hoelzmann, Torsten Klein, Frank Kutz, and Brigitta Schütt

A numerical inversion approach to detect and localize inclusions in thick walls under quasi-periodic natural solicitations is presented. It is based on a preliminary analysis of surface temperature field evolution with time. This analysis is improved by taking advantage of a priori information provided by ground-penetrating radar reconstructions. In this way, it is possible to improve the accuracy of the images achievable with the stand-alone thermal reconstruction method.

Nicolas Le Touz, Jean Dumoulin, Gianluca Gennarelli, and Francesco Soldovieri

Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a powerful tool that uses electromagnetic waves to obtain 3-dimensional images of natural or man-made structures and subsoil. It is employed in a large variety of applications in which non-destructive investigations are required. This paper deals with the use of GPR for the evaluation of moisture content in wood. The results of our work are of great interest for the preservation of timber structures, as moisture content is highly relevant to wood deterioration.

Hamza Reci, Tien Chinh Maï, Zoubir Mehdi Sbartaï, Lara Pajewski, and Emanuela Kiri

Application of elementary particle physics to the measurements of rock overburden density structures that might be directly applicable to natural resources and undiscovered cave explorations, and even to searching for hidden chambers in historic architectural structures.

H. K. M. Tanaka and M. Ohshiro

Physically based models that predict the properties of snow on the ground are used in many applications, but meteorological input data required by these models are hard to obtain in cold regions. Monitoring at the Sodankyla research station allows construction of model input and evaluation datasets covering several years for the first time in the Arctic. The data are used to show that a sophisticated snow model developed for warmer and wetter sites can perform well in very different conditions.

R. Essery, A. Kontu, J. Lemmetyinen, M. Dumont, and C. B. Ménard

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